What is a process server?

A process server is someone who serves legal documents to parties of a legal proceeding; in general, a private investigator or someone who works for a private investigator. The private investigator who serves these legal documents needs to be aware of federal, state and local laws pertaining to serving these documents, as well as which documents need to be hand delivered and which ones can be delivered via mail. While not every investigator or firm offers process server services, when a PI is hired for these services they are specially trained, so the task is done quickly, ethically and legally.

What does a process server do?

A process server delivers court documents to individuals and businesses who are party or witnesses to court proceedings.  The process starts with finding the person that needs the papers. Sometimes, these people may have skipped town or moved since the last time the serving party had contact with them. It is up to the process server to find out where the person lives or works, finds out when they will be either at home or work, and then they can deliver the papers.

What kind of training does a process server need?

The required training for a process server varies depending on the state, but for any process server it is ideal for them to be dually qualified as both a private investigator and a process server. It is very simple for an existing private investigator to branch out into process serving. They already have the training needed to locate people who may not want to be found, all that is left is learning the local, state and federal laws that pertain to when and where process serving is allowed.

Who hires a process server?

Just about anybody can hire a process server or a private investigator who offers process server services. Typically, attorneys are the main source of employment for a process server. They hire them to serve those who need official court documents. Potential employers can also use the services to present candidates with the request for their past employment and health histories. Individuals who cannot afford representation can also use the services to have their spouse served with divorce papers or another person served documents on a small claims court case. This is why it is important to hire a professional like a trained private investigator for any process serving needs.

What is a process server?

A process server is someone who serves legal documents to parties of a legal proceeding; in general, a private investigator or someone who works for a private investigator. The private investigator who serves these legal documents needs to be aware of federal, state and local laws pertaining to serving these documents, as well as which documents need to be hand delivered and which ones can be delivered via mail. While not every investigator or firm offers process server services, when a PI is hired for these services they are specially trained, so the task is done quickly, ethically and legally.

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What does a process server do?

A process server delivers court documents to individuals and businesses who are party or witnesses to court proceedings. These documents can be just about anything, from judgment papers and divorce papers to simple medical history or employment history requests. They may also be served to those who are called to testify in various court proceedings. The delivery of these documents is actually the end result of the job of the process server. The process starts with finding the person that needs the papers. Sometimes, these people may have skipped town or moved since the last time the serving party had contact with them. It is up to the process server to find out where the person lives or works, finds out when they will be either at home or work, and then they can deliver the papers. It takes a highly trained professional to not only serve the papers, but to locate the individual as well, which is why it is recommended to always hire the services of a qualified private investigator for any process serving needs.

What kind of training does a process server need?

The required training for a process server varies depending on the state, but for any process server it is ideal for them to be dually qualified as both a private investigator and a process server. To become an accredited and licensed private investigator, they have to go through at least a 2 year associate degree program with the major study of criminal justice. This type of degree offers courses in criminal justice as well as forensics training, investigation classes and juvenile justice courses. Through this degree program, the aspiring PI can enjoy a type of flexibility in their career. They can stick with the excitement of private investigations or they can branch out, earning a Bachelor and eventually a Master’s degree in criminal justice. These degrees will not only enhance the resume of the PI, but it can lead to other careers in the criminal justice field including police, detectives and even federal agency employment.

It is very simple for an existing private investigator to branch out into process serving. They already have the training needed to locate people who may not want to be found, all that is left is learning the local, state and federal laws that pertain to when and where process serving is allowed. For instance, some states do not allow any kind of sales or process serving between the hours of 10:00pm and 8:00am, while others do not allow process serving at a place of employment unless it is an agreed upon place and time.

Who hires a process server?

Just about anybody can hire a process server or a private investigator who offers the process server services. Typically, attorneys are the main source of employment for the process server. They hire them to serve those who need official court documents. Potential employers can also use the services to present candidates with the request for their past employment and health histories. Individuals who cannot afford representation can also use the services to have their spouse served with divorce papers or another person served documents on a small claims court case. Anyone who hires for these services should be aware of any former training their server has had to ensure that the job will be done ethically, without any legal recourse from the other party. This is why it is important to hire a professional like a trained private investigator for any process serving needs.

When you need to have any legal documents served to anyone, a spouse, former friend or a business, be sure that the person you have doing the process serving is qualified and experienced to locate the right person and get the documents to them in the right way.